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The Great Gatsby – An Analysis of Love


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"If love is only a will to possess, that is not love." The United States in the 1920s was a country where moral values ​​were decaying. Every American Has One Goal to Achieve: Success

Francis Scott Fitzgerald, author of The Great Gatsby, presents the real picture of American life in the 1920s. Like many of those days, only concerned with money; Being rich is their primary goal. As a result, their relationships are no longer based on love, failure

All relationships in the novel are failures because they are not based on love, but rather on the basis of love. Is materialism

An example of a failed relationship in The Great Gatsby is the affair between Tom Buchanan and Myrtle Wilson. This relationship is based on mutual exploitation. Tom uses Myrtle to make love; Myrtle received presents and money back. Tom Buchanan, resident of East Egg, is "old money", so he looks down on all those who are not from his class. So he treats Myrtle as if she's the trash. Myrtle Wilson, wife of the poor George Wilson, became dissatisfied with her 12-year marriage when her husband was unsuccessful. Her desire for a better life is evident when she recounts her first meeting with Tom:

"It's two seats facing each other, always the rest. On the train. New York to see my sister and spend the night, he wore a suit and patent leather shoes, and I could not keep an eye on him, but every time he looked at me I had to pretend to look at On my head, when we entered the station, he stood beside me, and his white shirt – my arm, and I told him I had to call the police, but he Glad to have a taxi with him, I do not know I did not go to the subway. I kept thinking, "I can not live forever, I can not live forever"

[19459MyrtleevenbelievedthatTomwouldleaveDaisyandmarryherInfactTomdidnotevenseeMyrtleasapersonbutasasexobjectThiswascleanedbytreatingMyrtleatthepartyespeciallywhenhebrokehisnosebecauseofthenervethatmentionshiswife'sname:

"Daisy! Daisy! Daisy!" "I can say it whenever I want Daisy!" Dai – "Doing a clever movement, Tom Buchanan shook hands with open hands" (Fitzgerald 43)

The nature of their relationship is strengthened when she dies. After the war with George Wilson, Myrtle ran toward the yellow car she thought was Tom. The yellow of the car represents the money, the wealth that Myrtle desires. Apparently, Daisy's vehicle is the direction, a symbol of materialism, and what happens there is an important symbol:

Touching [Myrtle] dives into the darkness, waving and Screaming … "Death car" as the press called it, did not stop … Myrtle Wilson, her life was extinguishing violence, knelt down on the road and her dense blood mixed with dust .. The mouth is wide open and torn a little at the corners, as if she had choking a bit on the great vigorousness she had stored so long (Fitzgerald 143-44).

The nature of the relationship between Tom and Myrtle is best symbolized by the expensive dog Toggle that Tom bought for Myrtle's dog. It reflects the fact that Tom is the master, who manages his "pet" with money. As the owner, Tom can freely do as he wishes. As a "dog," Myrtle accepts gifts for proper behavior. Tom's and Myrtle's inequality reflects the failure of their relationship, since its infidelity has failed since its inception.

The Buchanan marriage is also a completely fail. It was the war that separated Daisy and Gatsby, and his absence was one of the reasons she married Tom. However, the most important factor is money and status. Tom comes from a wealthy family. He can give Daisy everything she wants. The wedding proved this:

June [Daisy] was married to Tom Buchanan of Chicago, with more courage and circumstances than Louisville before. He came down with a hundred people in four private cars, and rented a floor of the Muhlbach Hotel, and one day before his wedding she gave her a string of pearls worth three hundred and fifty thousand dollars (Fitzgerald). 82)

It's a marriage of convenience – not love – obviously a few times in the novel. For example, while Daisy gave birth to their only child, "Tom is God knows" (Fitzgerald 23). Furthermore, Tom's indignation began only after three months of marriage. A report of Tom's accident refers to the maid's broken arm. Of course, Daisy knows how good Tom is; She even gave him a small yellow pencil to get a pretty but popular girl he was interested in Gatsby's party, though Tom pretended to move the table for another reason. The fact is that their marriage is based on wealth and power; That's what keeps them together, and that shows how barren marriage life is.

Gatsby is trying to separate Tom and Daisy. It was Gatsby's dream to reunite with Daisy, go back to the past and marry Daisy. This was his undying dream, as Gatsby told Nick: "Can not repeat the past?" [Gatsby]

After reuniting with Daisy, Gatsby begins a love affair because he is so rich; Daisy is a materialist who can be tempted by money. When they reunited for the first time, Daisy had only a little real emotion. Only when he showed his vast mansion and expensive possession that Daisy expresses strong emotions. For example, when Gatsby showed her her expensive clothes from England;

When the case between Gatsby and Daisy was discovered, Tom and Gatsby confronted Daisy. In this important event, Daisy reveals his true views on his love affair with Gatsby – that is simply a way to fill her empty days, an entertainment. It is also a revenge for the wonders of Tom. Deep in her heart, she is not resolved: "Oh, I want too much!" [Daisy] Gatsby exclaimed: "I love you now – not enough? I can not help what has passed."

After having betrayed Gatsby twice, Daisy betrayed him the last time – not wanting to face her death. "I once loved him, but I loved him too" (Fitzgerald 139). Consequences of Myrtle's death, Daisy and Tom plotted to capture Gatsby's frame by accident. Gatsby was later killed by George Wilson, because Tom made him believe Gatsby was Myrtle's lover and murderer.

Finally, this relationship was unsuccessful because Daisy had no value except Materialism; She did not even send a flower for Gatsby's

Love is essential in a relationship. However, materialism is essential to the relationship shown in The Great Gatsby. Those relationships are failures because they are set on the body rather than the spirit. Fitzgerald shows that any relationship based on materialism will fail in the end.

Source by Gradi Yanto

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